Migration Governance


Improving health through retaining livelihoods: why refugee policy cannot ignore animals

The movement of Ukrainian refugees and their pets across Europe’s borders unleashed an unprecedented solidarity with refugee animals, including the temporary lifting of transboundary veterinary requirements. Common responses to forced migration rarely facilitate or consider animals however; from basic shelter design, to refugee camp planning, and the provision of sanitation and food, animals are largely […]

Brazil’s new migration law: a huge step forward for migrant rights protection

by Diego Acosta This week (6 December) the Brazilian Congress voted by a majority of more than 70% in favour of the adoption of a new migration law. This law will replace the present framework adopted in 1980 during the military dictatorship (though it will only come into force after ratification by the Senate and […]

Comparing migration governance in Europe and South America

By Diego Acosta and Andrew Geddes How do regional responses to migration differ in Europe and South America? This is the question tackled by new MIGPROSP research, published in the European Journal of Migration and Law. Points of contact There are important points of contact between Europe and South America. The European Community (as it […]

The EU referendum and Britain’s broken immigration politics

by Andrew Geddes The decision in 2004 by Tony Blair’s New Labour government to allow unfettered access to the UK for citizens of the 8 central and east European EU newcomers has had monumentally important implications. Most other member states imposed transitional restrictions of up to 7 years. If Britain had done so too then […]