Convenors

 

The activities of the Working Group are currently co-organised by Elisa, Isabelle, Amber and Francesco (the VMHWG Team)!

The co-organisers of the Working Group are:

Elisa Chazal is a forth-year PhD researcher at the EUI’s Department of History and Civilisation. Her doctoral thesis explores the temporality of consumption at the end of the nineteenth century through the prism of an ephemeral attraction: the European historical re-enactments. Her interests include material culture, the usage of the past, and the consumption of artefacts and entertainments. She is currently one of the co-organisers of the Working Group.

 

 

 

Isabelle Riepe is a forth-year PhD Researcher at the EUI’s Department of History and Civilization. Her dissertation looks at the underlying material and intellectual conditions that influenced the emergence of the term Weltliteratur between 1750-1850 in German-speaking and -reading regions in Europe. Her previous training included global history and material culture history at the University of Warwick. Her interests include book history, material culture history, Eurasian (dis)connections and literary history. She is currently one of the co-organisers of the Working Group.

 

 

Amber Burbidge is a second year PhD History researcher at the EUI. Her research reassesses representations of race, gender, and Blackness in early modern material culture in Western European geographies, such as France and Britain, between 1650 -1800, with the aim of understanding the construction of early modern race-making through material sources. Her research develops from the Early Modern History Masters that she completed at the University of York which looked at the Black female presence in portraiture, prints, and porcelain racialised ornaments. She is currently one of the co-organisers.

 

Francesco Montuori is a second-year PhD researcher at the EUI’s Department of History and Civilisation. His research deals with chinoiserie in 18th-century Naples, as well as with issues related with the fields of museology, history of collecting and history of visual representation. His interests include material and visual culture in the early modern period and the relationship between Asia and Europe. He is currently one of the co-organisers of the Working Group.

 

 

The Founders and previous co-organisers of the Working Group are:

 

Ana Struillou is a former Ph.D. history researcher from the EUI. She is a historian of the early modern Mediterranean, interested in all things material and mobile. Her work explores the movement of artefacts and commodities between the Ottoman and non-Ottoman Maghrib, the Iberian Peninsula, and the French Monarchy across the early sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. She was one of the co-convenors of the Working Group.

 

 

 

Moïra Dato is a former Ph.D. researcher at the EUI’s Department of History and Civilisation. For her thesis, she explored the circulation of Lyonnais silks in Italy in the 18th century, analysing trade practices and consumption patterns. Her interests include the visual and material history of textiles in the early modern period, the social meanings of dress and the production and consumption of fashion in a trans-cultural perspective. She is now a post-doctoral researcher at the Department of the History of Textile Arts at the University of Bern. She was one of the co-founders and co-organisers of the Working Group.

 

Elena Maria Rita Rizzi is a former Ph.D. student in History and Civilization at the European University Institute, where she carried out a research project titled Modern Art and Republican Visual Politics in Interwar France, 1919-1940. Her thesis, defended in 2021, explored the relationship between visual arts and republican political cultures in interwar France. Elena’s main research interests lie in the relationship between culture and politics in Modern Europe and the role of the arts and culture in modern societies. She was one of the co-founders and co-organisers of the Working Group.

 

Iseabail Rowe is a former Ph.D. Candidate in the History and Civilization Department at the European University Institute where she worked on her thesis entitled The Torre dell’Orologio in context: Public Clocktowers in Renaissance Venice and the Venetian Territorial State. Formerly trained as an art historian, her interests lie at the intersection of social, spatial and architectural history, and its visual manifestations in images. She was one of the co-founders and co-organisers of the Working Group.