Blog Posts


COVID-19: the relaxation of measures and the multinational UK

In the UK, the COVID crisis has only served to exacerbate the problems within a system of ad-hoc, asymmetric federalism. Put simply, the approaches in the different countries of the UK have diverged for no good reason. This blog is intended to show the inconsistencies across the UK nations, briefly contextualising this within an uneven […]

Human Dignity: Hungary for Change? The EU, Backsliding States, and the First Foundational Value

Where there is democratic backsliding, it is perhaps unsurprising that vulnerable groups, such as trans people, face particularly significant threats to their rights. Important questions surround the legality of Hungary’s recent attack on trans rights, namely Art.33 of the ‘omnibus Bill’, but this post also turns to the bigger picture of the EU’s management of […]

Orbán is Still the Sole Judge of his Own Law

Our 22 April post on the Verfassungblog about Viktor Orbán’s state of emergency generated a thoughtful reply from Dr. Dániel Karsai, a well-respected Hungarian lawyer.   We appreciate the chance to respond to his criticisms, alleging that we made some factual errors about the operation of Hungarian law. One of these mistakes is that, as he correctly notes, […]

Poland, Hungary, and unconstitutional ‘exitspulsion.’ A response to Professor Christophe Hillion

Professor Christophe Hillion has published a stimulating and provocative blogpost suggesting that the Polish and Hungarian governments’ persistent refusal to observe the European Union’s (EU) key constitutional values can ‘arguably’ be interpreted as expressing their will to no longer apply the EU Treaties, and therefore as a notification of an intention to withdraw from the EU under Article […]